Monday, November 15, 2004


In a little over a month, young children throughout the world will go to sleep believing a benevolent, old man (or woman, in some parts of the world), will bring presents to them late in the night. Older children will be more skeptical and most adults will have long since given up any belief in such a tale.

I’m a little preoccupied with the Big Guy today since I just saw “Polar Express”, the new Tom Hanks movie by Pixar. Computer animation has come a long way since I was a teenager. By the end of the movie I was convinced that each character on the screen was a real person, even though I knew it was the voice and representation of Tom Hanks for five of the characters.

But that is what belief can do for us during a film or play. For a few minutes or hours we are transported into a world of make believe, far away from the cares of everyday life. While we can all decide for ourselves the existence of Mr. C., the concept of believing what one wants to believe is not a new idea. All great teachers have taught that it is our determination to see the end result that helps our endeavors into reality.

There are many ways to explain this phenomenon. Quantum physics teaches us that there is really one substance vibrating at different speeds; change the speed, change the substance. The metaphysical law of cause and effect tells the same story. The master metaphysician Ernest Holmes said, “Change your thinking, change your life.” Each modality holds the same message: Belief in the outcome.

One of the hardest chores we have in our daily lives is to believe something else than what we see directly in front of us. On Christmas morning, many children will be disappointed to see their new toy is not assembled. Instead of the finished prize, they will see an array of metal, screws, plastic, bolts and nuts. Their parents will see the finished product clearly from the directions and not be as discouraged with what they have in front of them. All right, so that’s a little too positive for most parents on Christmas morning, particularly if there is no Allen wrench in the house, but I did want to give them the benefit of the doubt.

The point is that belief will get us through even the most trying of times. Some men and women that have been put into solitary confinement for many years are released later in relatively good mental and physical health, even though most others may go mad after a short period of time. Why? The ones who survived had a stronger belief system. They created their own little world in their cell. It occupied their time and minds while others sat and bemoaned their plight.

Whatever your challenge is today, believe that an answer is available for you. There is only One Mind in the Universe, and you have access to all of that knowledge. Know that you know; or if you are not able to do that, at least know that whatever it is you need to know will be revealed to you at the exact time you need it.

In Spirit, Truth and Playfulness,

Dr. Terry

No comments: